Tuesday Adisa

You’re going to take it all back – mostly via translation into Arabic, Xhosa and Igbo. Nothing illegal or clandestine. Unless it’s really necessary.

Investment is transitory. Schools, universities and the Bibliotheca Alexandrina project are what will make Africa great again.

They soon back off when you show them the blade.

 


 

Investigator Name: Tuesday Naledi Adisa
Drive: Thirst for Knowledge
Occupation: Catalogue Agent
Occupational benefits: You may interact with bibliophiles at their Credit Rating.
Pillars of Sanity: Bibliotheca Alexandrina; self-sufficiency.
Build Points: 2

 

Bibliography 2
History 1
Languages 2

Library Use 2

Assess Honesty 4
Bargain 4
Credit Rating 2
Flattery 2

Document Analysis 1
Evidence Collection 1
Forgery 4

Auction 10
Athletics 5
Conceal 6
Disguise 6
Fleeing 5
Health 8
Psychoanalysis 3
Sanity 10
Stability 8
Sense Trouble 3
Shadowing 3
Stealth 5
Weapons 10

Ida sword
Hat, fur coat

 

Papyrus

 

Alun Cumming

Your elder brother is the Bishop of Bangor and you’ve heard people in the village refer to you laughingly as “The Second Cumming”.

You have a personal relationship with God; you don’t hold with all that skirt-swishing and high-and-mighty stuff.

You’ve a lot of good stock you can’t shift and all this hullabaloo about “The Lost Library of Ynys Môn” is a great opportunity to unload some of it onto another bookseller.

 


 

Investigator Name: Alun Cumming
Drive: Duty
Occupation: Bookseller
Occupational benefits: You operate with dual Credit Ratings, one for your shop and one for you; you may discover a “squiz” at the auction.
Pillars of Sanity: All of human knowledge; kindness is a cure; God moves in mysterious ways.
Build Points: 2

 

Accounting 2
Bibliography 4
Languages 4

Library Use 6
Textual Analysis 4
Theology 1

Bargain 2
Credit rating 3/4

Document Analysis 2

Auction 12
Driving 3
Electrical Repair 3
First Aid 5
Fleeing 5
Health 11
Mechanical Repair 3
Preparedness 6
Sanity 12
Stability 12
Sense Trouble 5

Three-wheeler van with cardboard boxes

 

Mercurius Image

 

Elspeth Cellan-Jones

You’re skint. The cads at the Glendower bookshop in Bangor claim never to have issued the chitty for the Bewick engraving you left for authentication. They won’t return the item.

You’ll have to pal-up with another buyer to act on any squiz at the auction. Shouldn’t be too difficult: those minor public-school types will buy or swap anything with a bit of phoney Latin.

Your bike is your pride and joy and will get you anywhere with a road.

 


 

Investigator Name: Elspeth Cellan-Jones
Drive: Greed
Occupation: Book Scout
Occupational benefits: Always the first to discover inconspicuous clues among books.
Pillars of Sanity: Welsh nationalism; wild swimming; healthy competition.
Build Points: 2

 

Architecture 1
Bibliography 2
Languages 2

Library Use 2

Assess Honesty 1
Bargain 2
Credit Rating 1
Reassurance 2
Streetwise 2

Document Analysis 1
Evidence Collection 4

Auction 8
Athletics 4
Conceal 2
Filch 6
Fleeing 6
Health 10
Preparedness 4
Riding (bicycle) 6
Sanity 12
Stability 12
Sense Trouble 4
Shadowing 3
Stealth 3

Racing bicycle and paniers

 

AzSpell1

 

The Lost Library of Ynys Môn

 

Children of the Spirit

 

I’m fairly confident of being able to offer a game for Bookhounds of London at Concrete Cow on March 17th called The Bees of the Invisible.

Five bookhounds and a dreamhound will convene for an auction of unusual items at a Welsh country house.

Here is the catalogue of works for sale:

 

 

The Lost Library of Ynys Môn

Catalogue for the private auction of works from the Collection of Henry Cyril Paget,
5th Marquess of Anglesey.

 

2. The Parable of the Strange Fruit by the Reverend C A Johns.

Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, London, 1887. 4to. Leather half-cloth, rubbed to extremities. Condition: Fair. Five of six hand-drawn plates remain, two of which have been re-glued; front hinge also re-glued. Closed slit to front external hinge. Fraying top and bottom of spine. Some underlining, particularly to rear parts of text.

Believed to be the only remaining copy in circulation of the Rev. C A Johns’ first-person account of rhubarb grown by the light of the full moon: he believed these to have been harvested by faeries. Johns later recanted and ordered all copies of his work destroyed.

 

3. The Bees of the Invisible by Mrs Eileen Donaghy.

Women’s Institute of Pembroke, Bangor, 1902. 8vo. Green cloth with gilt. Eight black and white engravings by the author. Condition: Very Good.

Each of Angelsey’s 28 cromlechs is adumbrated by Mrs Donaghy’s coruscating commentary concerning their use for “base and licentious acts” in pre-Christian times; pp56-84 concern the perils of drink.

 

4. Brytanici Imperii Limites by Dr John Dee.

Elias Ashmole, Oxford, 1677. 8vo. Black leather with decorative silver gilt, split at the spine and with singing patterns to the bottom right of the text block; front bottom right corner frayed. Condition: Good.

“The Limits of the British Empire”. The voyages of King Arthur and other legendary mariners, including Welsh prince Madoc, who crossed the Atlantic in in 1170 and met the winged fae-folk of Saguenay. Map missing from rear board.

 

5. The Secret Commonwealth; or an Essay on the Nature and Actions of the Subterranean (and for the most part) Invisible People heretofore going under the names of Fauns and Fairies, or the like, among the Low Country Scots as described by those who have second sight, 1691 by Robert Kirk.

Archibald, Constable and Co for Sir Walter Scott, Edinburgh, 1815. 8vo. Half-calf with marbled boards and gilt lettering to the spine; slightly rubbed. Condition: Very Good.

Folklore from traditional accounts in the Scottish Highlands; reports that the author was carried away to fairyland for revealing the secrets of the Good People remain unconfirmed.

 

6. The Last Testament of King Maeglwyn Gwynedd.

Palimpsest of paper and vellum materials, c.1188; rebound in calfskin, Bangor, 1837. 8vo. Condition: Fair.

Handwritten text in dark blue ink includes many crossings- and workings-out: appears to sign over the Isle of Ynys Môn and much of North Wales to the “King of the Birds”.

 

7. The Horoscope of Benvenuto Cellini by Consuela du Pre.

Theosophical Society, London, 1901. 8vo. Decorative blue leather boards bearing the embossed coat of arms of the famous goldsmith and sculptor. Condition: Very Good.

Mrs Du Pre follows the Roman astrologer Manilius in insisting that a child born while the Sun is in Scorpio has “a spirit which rejoices in plenteous bloodshed and in carnage more than in plunder”; pp101-110 detail a cure for gonorrhoea derived from Pliny the Elder.

 

8. Mona and the Moon by “Sister Dierdre”.

Women’s Institute of Pembroke, Bangor, 1907. 4to. Blue cloth with decorative gilt. Centrepiece intact. Condition: Good.

Tidal patterns and lunar cycles on “Hook’s Island” (an older name for the Isle of Angelsey); intended as a treatise for children, it includes seventeen hand-drawn illustrations by local artist Cerys Llewellyn and a full-colour frontispiece by the (as yet unidentified) “Monk of Ynys Môn”.

 

9. New Hyperborean Grammar (4vols).

Skara Brae Press, Kirkwall, 1877. Blue half-cloth with light blue decorative trim and decorative silver gilt. Large item(s).

Claims to be a partially-revised edition of a work first produced at Gardar monastery in Greenland at the end of the fourteenth century. Volumes 2-4 comprise indices and commentary.

 

10. Codex Hibernica by Alejandro Cacamatzin.

Date unknown, Skellig, rebound circa 1560. Folio. Text in Latin and Nahuatl with Aztec pictograms. Whale-skin with decorative insignia, bumped at the bottom right corner of front and back boards and turned at the bottom right outer edge of the text block.

How to perform the intricately-costumed butterfly-dance of Itzpapalotl, the “Obsidian Butterfly”, by an exiled Mexican priest. 64 full-colour illustrations by an unknown hand. Six black and white illustrations of clochán-type beehive cells with an appendix of twenty-one hand-drawn stone crosses and slabs. The favourite item of the 5th Marquess.

11. Knowledge of Angels by Katherine Dee.

Reginald Newbury, Shrewsbury, 1608. 8vo. Leather boards with unstitched signatures. Five colour plates, two pull-out diagrams and 14 black and white illustrations. Text in English, Hebrew and Adamic script.

Includes a phonetic incantation to call forth Uriel from ancient stone and a pull-out design for a “Table of Practice” based on her father’s tradition. A unique item.

 

12. Liber Experimentorum by Ramon Llull.

Bartholomäus Leonhard Schwendendörffer, Antwerp, 1664. 8vo. Calf with decorative gilt. Pagination awry. Condition: Very Good. Catalan, Arabic and Latin text with pictograms of unknown provenance.

Llull’s “Book of Experiments” combines logic and natural philosophy to record the spiritual effects of Majorcan flora on imprisoned infidels.

Suicide Squad

Suicide_Squad_Vol_5_1

 

“I’m a man, okay? I ain’t no Weapon,” insists Chato Santana, or “El Diablo” as the pyrokinetic Los Angeles gang member is generally known. Assassin-for-hire “Deadshot” (Smith) soon persuades Diablo to employ his napalm-like Psi Powers on behalf of the nation whose system of Crime and Punishment so often informs the themes and character-arcs of its Superhero narratives, from the genesis of Batman in Detective Comics #27 (May 1939) to the successful forays into on-demand Television on the part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe in Daredevil (2015-current) and Luke Cage (2016-current). One might argue that the entire genre is about turning oneself into the means by which Cities and communities are defended or destroyed, and that by combining the journey of the Hero from Greek Mythology with the trope of the Mysterious Stranger in Le Comte de Monte-Christo (1844-1845 18vols; trans Emma Hardy as The Count of Monte Cristo 1846 3vols) Alexandre Dumas laid the genre’s most important cornerstone: the confluence of a secret Identity with a thirst for revenge:-

 

Suicide Squad entry

 

Detective_Comics_27

Monte Cristo

Blindness

A disquisition on traffic-flow soon gives way to descriptions of the behaviour of light under observation (see Physics) and these and many other explanations of everything-at-once to an analysis of the relationship of Money to Economics and of “rational self-interest” to the Metaphysics of everyday life: “Everything we eat has been stolen from the mouths of others,” says the character known only as “The Doctor” (Ruffalo): “If we rob them of too much, we are responsible for their deaths… in a way, we are all murderers.” Saramago takes care to distinguish the sudden irruption of his “White Signus” from known varieties of blindness (see Medicine) and thereby to identify it as a “blindness of rationality” on the scale of a Disaster: this is, in other words, the catastrophe of the twentieth century writ large and described in chatty, free-ranging and precise style at the scale of the human, sometimes from the point of view of a particular human being, usually that of “The Doctor’s Wife” (Moore), sometimes at the level of the pack of blind humans for whom she is responsible and sometimes, boldly, directly and with no loss of dramatic focus, at the level of humanity’s shared past, as “you”, the reader, or “we” who are reading this, the world-changing Memes of a variety of thinkers, such as Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) – “What is right and what is wrong are simply different ways of understanding our relationships with the others…” – or the critique by Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) of the relationship between Identity and self-presence, or, indeed, the assault by Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) on the ontology of Western discourse, part of which informed Derrida’s interrogation of “rationalist” thinkers and the French philosopher’s insistence on Linguistics as the best means of analysis of those cultures that define themselves by contrast with those they consider less “developed”, as in: “There’s no difference between inside and outside, between here and there, between the many and the few, between inside and outside, between what we’re living through and what we shall have to live through.” Every aspect of human behaviour is illuminated by the onset of “white” blindness, from the necessary delusions of human relationships to the deep-seated affiliation between fascism and the imposition of Sex on the unwilling: the breakdown of the social contract here reveals what the social contract was obscuring, a form of impaired vision from which we all, to greater or lesser extent, suffer. “It is beginning to emerge that this distinction between nature and society (‘nature’ and ‘culture’ seem preferable to us today), while of no historical significance, does contain a logic, fully justifying its use by modern sociology as a methodological tool,” Anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss wrote in Les Structures élémentaires de la parenté (1949 trans James Bell, John von Sturmer and Rodney Needham as The Elementary Structures of Kinship 1969), but Saramago, like Derrida, goes beyond the convenience of this distinction to reveal how deeply human instincts are embedded in culture and now intrinsic cultural definitions are to descriptions of apparently natural behaviours:-

Blindness entry

 

ensaio-sobre-a-cegueira2

Ashurbanipal

 

IMG_3108

 

 

The Assyrian king (668-627 BC) wasn’t above collecting books as war booty and I’m afraid we rather mashed-up the royal library when carpet-bagging its contents back to Europe.

Iraqi archaeologists are now excavating at Nineveh while scientists at the British Museum create an electronic catalogue of the cuneiform tablets that are available.

I find them very beautiful.

 

IMG_3104