Blade Runner 2049

“Am I the only one who can see the fucking sense, here?” asks K’s boss at the Los Angeles Police Department, Lieutenant Joshi (Wright): “This breaks the world, K.” “The ancient models give the entire endeavour a bad name,” says Wallace’s corporate enforcer and later-model replicant Luv (Hoeks). This is the way mid-twenty first century Earth is organized: cops, renegades and production units. Any production unit that goes renegade is “retired” (i.e. murdered) by a Blade Runner, itself a production unit of a system of Crime and Punishment that exists to protect the commercial interests of the Corporations. The tripartite power structure mirrors the Subhuman/Protagonist/Übermensch methodology of mid-era Philip K Dick, which Dick himself laid out in a long letter to fellow sf writer Ron Goulart in the summer of 1964: “The entire dramatic line of the book hinges on the impact between [the Übermensch] and [the Subhuman],” Dick is quoted as writing to Goulart in Divine Invasions: A Life of Philip K. Dick (1989), “…the personal problem of [the Subhuman] is the public solution for [the Übermensch].” Here, the “miracle birth” McGuffin of Rachael’s lost child Messiah – a common motif in the work of Philip K Dick, whose dedication to a Drug-fuelled Jungian version of the Gnostic Religion only intensified over the course of the 1960s – is used to relate the domestic concerns of K, and those of the protagonist of the first film, Rick Deckard (Ford), to the world-sized problem faced by Niander Wallace, the Übermensch who replaces Eldon Tyrell in Dick’s schema from Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968):-

Blade Runner 2049 entry

 

White Knight


In 1539 the Knight Templars of Malta, paid tribute to Charles V of Spain, by sending him a Golden Falcon encrusted from beak to claw with rarest jewels – but pirates seized the galley carrying this priceless token and the fate of the Maltese Falcon remains a mystery to this day –

With
Humphrey BOGART as Dashiell HAMMETT
and/or
Sir Lanzilot on the Bridge of Swords

“He did what he thought was right.”

Also Starring
Mary ASTOR
Peter LORRE
Sydney GREENSTREET
Gladys GEORGE
Elisha COOK, Jr.
&
Space MONKEY as The Demiurge

Screenplay by
Wolfram von ESCHENBACH

From a Story by
Chrétien de TROYES

“World of Shit” is from the album Souljacker by Eels (2001).

Riotous Assembly


Gala gave a Tarot reading, “Crooked Bob” Nottingham made an assignation with Georges Bataille’s secret cadre of satanic bankers and Edward Cody sold the first-ever copy of Une semaine de bonté for eight times the value anyone was expecting. He ended the evening by emptying his six-shooter into a line of five champagne bottles outside the Galerie de rêve, using his final bullet to dislodge an enormous hat designed by Salvador Dalí from Gala’s head. She loved it and so did the crowd.

Things didn’t go so well for poor old Anton Du Marr. Max Ernst – the influential patron who had identified his painting The Rose Tree as “a work of profound and disquieting genius” – disdained Du Marr’s new work White Bear in Snow (a collage of white pieces of paper on white canvas) by throwing it out of the open door of the gallery. Du Marr later discovered that someone had sold the work from under him for an exorbitant sum. In other news, Gala has a new hat.

The player-characters’ new-found celebrity has won them an audience with excommunicated dream medium Robert Desnos, a sensitive man who has committed the unforgivably-bourgeois sin of going into radio jingles. André Breton will not be pleased.


End of Year

img_0003


The rules of money are precise and invariable. Money attracts money, money seeks to accumulate in the same places, money is naturally attracted to scoundrels and those who are entirely bereft of any talent. When, by an exception which proves the rule, money finds its way into the hands of a man who, though wealthy, is neither a miser nor has any murderous proclivities, it stands idle, incapable of creating a force for good, incapable of even making its way into charitable hands who would know how to employ it. One might almost say that it takes revenge for its misdirection, that it undergoes a voluntary paralysis whenever it enters into the possession of someone who is neither a born swindler nor a complete and utter dotard.

When, by some extraordinary chance, it strays into the home of a poor man, money behaves even more inexplicably. It defiles immediately what was clean, transforms even the chastest pauper into a monster of unbridled lust and, acting simultaneously on the body and the soul, instils in its possessor a base egoism, not to mention an overweening pride, which insists that he spends every penny on himself alone; it makes even the humblest arrogant, and turns the generous person into a skinflint. In one second, it changes every habit, upsets every idea, transforms the most deep-seated passions.

Money is the greatest nutrient imaginable for sins of the worst kind, which in a sense it aids and abets. If one of the custodians of wealth so forgets himself as to bestow a boon or make a donation, it immediately gives rise to hatred in the breast of the recipient; by replacing avarice with ingratitude, the equilibrium is established again: a new sin is commissioned by every good deed which is committed.

But the real height of monstrosity is attained when money, hiding the splendour of its name under the dark veil of the word, calls itself capital. At that moment its action is no longer limited to individual incitations to theft and murder, but extends across the entire human race. With a single word capital grants monopolies, erects banks, corners markets, changes people’s lives, is capable of causing millions to starve to death.

And all the while that it does this, money is feeding on itself, growing fat and breeding in a bank vault; and the Two Worlds worship it on bended knee, melting with desire before it, as before a God… Either money, the master of the soul, is diabolical or else it is beyond explanation.


– J K Huysmans, Là-Bas (1891)